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No market this year, Options!


I’m sorry to say that there will be no Farmer At Your Door this year. But you have options! In my effort to keep you fed and happy,. Tracys Farm Bus is an awesome option. She appears in many places with local, healthy product. She also delivers. I am also in touch with many growers myself. If you need items, let me know. There are many ways to get you those items. I would like to thank all of you for remaining wonderful customers and great local businesses. This is not the end all your food options this could be just the beginning of your awareness of our local growers and businesses. Please email me at bogie3513@msn.com if you need anything, well not anything, maybe a little lettuce, turkey, a radish, a loaf of bread, not just anything. I would love to keep in touch with all of you.if you need further information on how to get ahold of Tracy, I would be more than happy to let you know. Merry

Turkeys!


Never say never.

Here I am again.

I would like to tell you about the availability of organic turkeys from Redmer Farms. Please contact Ann directly at amoyer2151@aol.com There are only 5-6 left. You will remember Redmer farms for their great organic produce through the season and these were the turkeys that were gobbling as I visited the farm.

Enjoy your hibernation; it’s always followed by renewal and growth. I’m hoping not to grow too much myself through the holidays.

Merry

Tracy's Farm Bus


As promised, here’s a little more info on Tracy’s Farm Bus, from Tracy, herself. A new way to get local food in Rock County and surrounding areas.


Hello farm-fresh food fans!
My name is Tracy Thompson, owner of Tracy’s Farm Bus, which will launch later this month! Growing up on a dairy farm in Richland County, I understand the true value of wholesome farm-fresh meat and produce, and Tracy’s Farm Bus is my way to deliver it right to your doorstep!

I grew up on my grandparents’ dairy farm in Bear Valley Wisconsin. We primarily milked Holstein cows but also raised poultry. After graduating from River Valley High School I spent more than a decade in Chicago, where I received two degrees: a bachelor’s in business administration and a catering and personal chef certificate from Kendall College. I met my husband, Tim, in 2009 and soon after moved back to Wisconsin.

We’ve called Milton home for the past four years. Tim and I decided early into our relationship that our dream was to own a small farm in the country where we could grow our own food and raise livestock. We found our dream property in the summer of 2012; it’s now known as High Five Acres, where we raise meat and dairy goats, chickens, turkey, ducks and geese.

Like everyone at Farmer At Your Door, Tim and I believe in the health benefits of consuming local, farm-fresh food whenever possible, not to mention the added community and economic benefits that result from supporting family farms. Tim and I registered with Farmer at Your Door in 2013 as both producers and consumers and immediately fell in love with the concept.

Farmer at Your Door made me think about how I could help provide even more people with access to farm-fresh food — especially those who may not have access to them in close proximity to their homes — and Tracy’s Farm Bus was born! Rick and Diedre have been strong supporters of my efforts to build this business and I feel completely blessed by their “we’re all in this together” attitude.
The goal of Tracy’s Farm Bus is similar to that of FAYD: To offer the same high-quality, fresh food that members have come to rely on, but with some expanded options that we believe our customers will find useful. Our mission is to offer only products that have been produced by small, family farms in Wisconsin, to provide more seasonal choices, and to provide home delivery six days per week.

Initially, Tracy’s Farm Bus will serve customers in Rock and parts of Dane, Green, Jefferson and Walworth counties. Online ordering is available 24/7 with delivery right to your doorstep as early as 10 a.m. the following day on most items.

As Tracy’s Farm Bus grows we will expand our service area and make house calls, providing customers a “shop straight from the bus” experience at their home. Our long-term plan is to purchase a refrigerated delivery truck, allowing us to make extended stops in neighborhoods, at community events and the like.
Our farm, High Five Acres, is just one of many that will source food for Tracy’s Farm Bus. In addition, several Farmer at Your Door producers have expressed interest in sourcing, as well. We welcome anyone who wants to participate. No farm is too small!
Our website, located at http://www.tracysfarmbus.com, is being built, but for now, please “like” Tracy’s Farm Bus on Facebook. We’ll also be at the Shop Local Expo in Janesville on Sunday, Nov. 3 to meet everyone, answer questions and sell some of our locally sourced products!
I hope you enjoy the adventure as much as I am!

Regards,
Tracy

Over and Out


Yesterday I was very Merry. As I sit here this morning eating half a cheddar scone and a slice of Maui bread, I reflect on where I was 6 months ago and where I am now. I came to you because the big boss needed help. I am a thinker. Don’t call me a worrier; that’s a negative thing. So I thought out this new proposition; sure I can travel to farms, deliver to customers; sure… sure I can… When did this thing become alive. How did this simple pickup and delivery service become an emotional part of my week?

Here’s the emotional part;
I stop at Plymouth Rock to see a HUGE pickup. Most definitely the biggest pickup from them I’ve had. All of you appreciate their hard work. As I was sorting through their orders, that were beautiful crisp greens, pumpkins, canned goodies, squash and my tomato marmalade (thankyou)…the neighbor came over to play with Sadie. Remember Sadie? The cute little dog who piddled at my feet last time? Well she’s a little bigger, now she resembles a muppet. I got a happy, jumping, bounding, hyperactive greeting. she would run and run and come back to me and jump and jump when suddenly she realized – “Oh hey – I’m going next door”. Put a cape on that dog and you have Mighty Dog! Away she flew. She was at the neighbors house before she could get back on her 4wheeler to go home. Goodbye Sadie. You are an awesome dog.

The Alpacas; they were running to my car thinking I had treats. I don’t know what alpaca’s eat as treats or I would have had some. They kept their distance however. I will miss your hairy faces and crooked teeth.

Ganooch the honey pooch detected me on his porch. Suddenly he became alert; “who are you; what are you doing; I’m telling my parents”, but he kept looking at me putting his head through the lovely lace curtains at this great little cottage. He really didn’t care about me, he looked at the cars and the birds and the trees and just has a happy life. See ya next year Ganooch.

Bridgets Bakery; I got a load of bakery items. You guys know what good baked stuff is. I got my share for the freezer also. Bridget and her family are very nice people. All of our businesses are family run. She makes all of her stuff from scratch. My son; who travels with me on most Thursdays, say that they all want to talk to you mom. He didn’t say it exactly like that, but that is what I can put in print here. Yes I talk a lot. Oops.

Ground to Table; a beautiful family that makes homemade goodies, plus wheatgrass for your pets. You can find them at Fort Atkinson farmers market during the season. Thank you for my treats Barb. I found Kimchi through you. Good stuff! I will miss seeing your well thought out beautiful landscape and calming environment.

Redmer Farms; You work so hard producing organic vegetables, loading up your product and getting them to a place where I can pick them up. Your customers love you. I love your carrots! There was a story once where I forgot your watermelon in my car for a customer… don’t ask me how I didn’t see it – it was huge, but I drove back to her to make sure she got it the same day. She loved it.

Afton Mini Mart; I’m sure I’ll see you tomorrow, you’re that close. It was very bothersome to pickup warm bread every week, so warm the plastic couldn’t be sealed until I got there. I wanted to eat them. Yes I have a carb issue. It’s probably your fault too.

Bass Creek; You know I love you guys. I’ll be up to have some biscuits and gravy and a mocha soon. It’s a beautiful place to sit and watch the snow slowly fall. They’re not open on Sundays, but you may find me up there on a Saturday if you want to sit and chat.

All of you customers…(more emotions appearing), you are simply not people who want good food, you are lovely, honest, giving, hard working, appreciative, kind individuals. I was challenged my first week to pay it forward. All of you do that every week; you’re that kind of people, it’s easy to pay it forward when in the presence of all of you. You’re uplifting. You truly are.

To Basics who let us land there every Thursday night. I had a hoot. You play the best music. We danced. “Secret Agent Man” is my favorite. Maybe we should start a dance club in front of the windows at Basics. Considering I threw out my knee a couple weeks ago dancing, I’m still willing to commit to this activity. What a better story… “Oh how did you hurt your knee?” “Dancing to Blurred Lines” said I. (don’t go visual please)

I would also like to thank Rick and Deidre. You’re awesome bosses. This was great.

So as the winter approaches, and our gardens have all croaked, light your fireplace, get your blankie, hug your dog or significant other, enjoy the holidays and remember that the earth is just waiting for you next spring.

Eat, Drink and Be Merry

I am

Hurry! Almost time!


Market closes at 7pm. I’m about to break a sales record here. Help me out!

You may want to consider Christmas. There are plenty of hand crafted, homemade preserves and goodies from Plymouth Rock and Ground to Table. Save them up, don’t eat them (ya, it’s a challenge) and give them as gifts. Honey, Jam and a fresh loaf of bread in a basket to a friend is a great Christmas gift. I shall give you my address if you don’t know who to give them to…..

As we close, please remember our vendors and the work they put into your products. Our bakers prepare your baked items the morning of delivery. I have had to go back to the bakeries to pickup items that were not quite out of the oven. Last time I had a nice young man run a hot loaf of poppyseed bread to me in the car as I was pulling away for one of you. Most of your vendors have 2 jobs. Farming and baking are their first loves, but they need to work another job to support their farming/baking lifestyles. You benefit from that.

I am looking forward to my Copra onions that will keep along time, well; unless I eat them all sooner than expected. I do have a bushel of peppers in the fridge that I will saute’ up with these onions, throw a few eggs into and serve on rye toast from Bridgets Bakery.

I’ll email one more time after delivery. The freeze means more to me this year. I am not only losing my garden, I am losing contact with all of you. So…..
Happy Halloween!
Happy Thanksgiving!
Merry Christmas!
Happy New Year!
etc etc.

See ya soon

Merry

Check these out.


The market closes tonight at 7pm. There are some good peppers on line that you may be overlooking. Poblano’s are my favorite. I love Chile Rellano’s at El Jardine’s and cannot make them right, but this is my version. Cut poblano in half, roast or not roast – don’t care. Seed them. I sprinkle some parmesan cheese in the bottom, then some mozzarella, then a slice of tomato and then some monterey jack cheese with some panko crumbs on top. I then bake those babies for 15 minutes or so at 350. Just keep looking at the oven to make sure the cheese dosn’t does burn.

Peppers also easily freeze. Cut then up and put them in a ziploc. I use them all winter in stews, chili, pizza etc. Be creative. In January you will be happy you did.

If you’ve followed my advice, you will now have frozen basil, frozen tomatoes and frozen peppers. Sounds like an interesting crockpot meal in the winter.

If you with to follow me on Facebook, search for Merry’s Garden of Eatin’. We can chat about recipes, gardening, winter harvest and fun things I find. Or email me at bogie3513@msn.com
I will post what I have been doing with our frozen delights. And I will let you know how the cherry and grape wine turned out. The last taste before racking was sweet grape and dry cherry. One more racking and we should have the crud removed.

We close tonight for the last time at 7pm. If you have placed an order and wish more, don’t attempt to alter your first order, just add another one. I can always fix it.

http://scwisc.locallygrown.net

See ya soon,
Merry

Open!


This week is our last week. Together, let’s make it a good one.

I thought I’d share a little history as I promised earlier in the season. All farmers have history. Where did their farm come from? How long have they lived there? Is this a family operation, or is this a new family tradition?

My little farmette came from my grandparents. Their first farm was on Plymouth Church Rd, out of Beloit. It was described as the true Ma & Pa Kettle type farm by relatives who were there. Chickens were in the kitchen, no screens on the kitchen door and grandpa didn’t always finish the duties grandma believed he should. She was Swiss and he was Irish. 100% each. I believe there was some fierly issues going on there. One family member talked about a teacup “flying” through the air and landing on grandpa’s forehead. Knowing grandma; I believe it. Grandpa passed away before I met him. But before that, the family had a tragedy. Their son enlisted in the National Guard. Grandma thought it would make a man out of him. He was; perhaps, slightly disabled. He wrote beautiful letters that I still have, but the research shows he had difficulty mastering the skills needed to be in the National Guard. Bernard was shipped to the Philippines. He was a member of the Tank Battalion of Janesville. After he was captured; he only lived a couple of months. You see, he was forced to bury a man alive and could not live with himself any longer and refused to eat until he died.

Grandma and my mother rarely spoke of him. I did not know details until well after my mother died and I did research myself. I found a life insurance payment to my grandmother after Bernard’s death. It was about the time the family moved from Plymouth Church to the land I have now. I am not certain, but I believe that life insurance policy paid for this land. It was a decent windfall at that time.

So, the tomatoes you eat, the kimchi you buy that comes from local cabbage, the very earth that is still attached to the cucumber in your order has history; local family history. In my case, you’ve purchased produce grown on land received from the ultimate sacrifice. A soldier.

I bet you will look at produce a little differently now.

See ya soon.

Merry

Prepare for last order!


I will send another reminder tomorrow before I open market for it’s last week of the season.

I came into this market as manager just a few months ago. You would think the best thing about an on-line farmers market is the produce/products. For me, the best thing was the people I met. And a few animals,Ganooch, Sadie, 2 anonymous white shepards, whining alpaca’s, a little dog in a yellow car. A couple of miracle twins finally smiled at me. Their parents have been smiling since they were born.

Let me tell you about the products I’ve enjoyed. Last night we had potstickers (no one grows them), but on the side we had Plum and Pepper Sweet and sour sauce from Ground to Table. It was the best I’ve ever had. Their apple honey jam is awesome too. Ground to table has Maui bread that the jam would be great on!
In your mind picture an old fashioned gift shop with candles, small lights, beautiful crystal and knick knacks and smells….. the smells can be purchased from Bridget’s bee’s or Ananda Organics in the form of soaps or scrubs. There is no actual gift shop, but that is what the smells remind me of. And they’re hand crafted, so they’re much better for your skin and last longer too.
Bridgets bakery offers awesome breads, muffins, pies and treats. Buy what you can now and freeze for later. You know I love the white chocolate raspberry muffins. Rye bread havarti toasted cheese was awesome. In the summer we added fresh tomatoes to that mix. We’ll see what I add through the winter.
Plymouth Rock and Redmer Farms have delighted me with jams and carrots. They have many loyal customers who will miss their produce.
Afton Mini-Mart and Bass Creek are both within a half of mine of our little farm. I am very lucky to get bread, coffee, muffins and homecooked meals whenever I want. You may find my son at any time at Afton Mini-Mart ordering a sub sandwich with homemade bread. If you get a chance to drive to Afton, try out both of those businesses. Basscreek has great biscuits and gravy, breakfast and lunch specials. I love their mocha’s. It’s all good.

I will never forget my drive to Paoli Local Foods/Ruegseggers. It’s a beautiful area and there are great items to eat there and take away.

I’m already missing the garden and new fresh prodduce. I’m anxious to plant stuff in the greenhouse early spring. Early baby lettuce would be wonderful right now.

So – make this last week a good one. If you would like a Friday delivery instead of Thursday – I can do this for you. Just indicate so on the invoice. Let’s prove to the boss (Thanks R&D)that we will miss this market. I know I will.
On-line market will open tomorrow afternoon for the last time of the year.
boohoo.
http://scwisc.locallygrown.net

See ya Soon.

Merry

Last Weekend For The Year Coming Up


The harvest season is almost over. So, after this weekend, it’s time for our market to take the winter off. We all thank you so much for the wonderful season. Thank you for your orders, your support of local food, but most of all, for your trust.

We made sure you would have an easy option for finding local, delicious food after this weekend. Tracy’s Farm Bus in Milton is starting at the beginning of the November. We’ll be sending you more info on how find Tracy’s Farm Bus in the next couple of weeks.

scwisc.locallygrown.net

10 minute bonus-hurry


I normally shut down at 7:00. I will give you until 7:11. Get your orders in now.
Thanks to all of you have ordered. LOTS of you make me happy tonight!